3D Printed Sculptures Come To Life

Stanford University employs the renowned John Edmark, who is a designer, artist, professor, and inventor, who used 3D printers to create zeotropic blooms. These sculptures can be seen in action on Edmark’s Vimeo page.

If you view the videos of his 3D sculptures, spinning at 550 revolutions per minute, while they are being recorded with a high speed camera or a regulated strobe light, they seem to come to life. The way that these work is that each section of the sculpture is placed at a specific distance from the other according to the Fibonacci sequence and at a specific angle (the Golden angle that is defined by the Fibonacci sequence.

If you download the schematics for these 3D sculptures from Edmark’s Drop Box page, you can create your own copies of these mind boggling sculptures. It is also important that you remember that if you do download the schematics for these sculptures, that you are agreeing to be bound by Non-Commercial, Creative Commons licenses.

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Sept. 26, 2018